A Brief History of Route 66

All Seasons RV is a proud member of the ROUTE 66 RV Network, the largest network of independent RV dealers in North America. But not too many people know the real history of America’s Mother Road. Time magazine offers a great summary here: 

For nearly six decades, a two-lane road, running 2,448 miles, connected Chicago to Los Angeles. It was the path to Western promise for “Okies” escaping the Dust Bowl in the 1930s, the road under the soles of American nomads like Jack Kerouac. Route 66 was once considered an essential artery, its travelers a measure of America’s pulse. But by the mid-1980s, the road was deemed obsolete.

 Twenty-five years ago on June 27, Route 66 was decommissioned. But even as the no-tell motels and mom-and-pop shops along the road disappeared, the fables of America’s “Mother Road” continued to ramble on.

In the 1920s, federal highway officials, faced with growing automobile ownership (registered motor vehicles grew from 500,000 in 1910 to almost 10 million in 1920) and the impracticality of disjointed, named trails, began to develop a numbered road system. Oklahoma real estate agent and coal company owner Cyrus Avery worked with John Woodruff, a highway proponent, to advocate a diagonal roadway running from Chicago to Los Angeles. 

As an Oklahoman, Avery, who was also largely responsible for getting America’s Main Street its name, lobbied for the route because it would redirect traffic from Kansas City, Mo., and Denver and boost the state’s prosperity. The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) initially named the road Route 60 and then Route 62. 

Avery “strenuously objected” to the switch, even penning a letter to AASHTO executive secretary William Markham saying, “You are making a joke of the interstate highway.” On April 30, 1926, the route was renamed. Avery became known as the “Father of Route 66,” with Springfield, Mo., its birthplace.

 

Camping Recipe: Chilaquiles with Blistered Tomatillo Salsa and Eggs

Ingredients

SERVINGS: 4

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil, plus more for grill
  • 2 pounds tomatillos (about 20 medium), husks removed, rinsed
  • 2 jalapeños
  • 1 large white onion, quartered through root end
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans, rinsed
  • 1 10-ounce bag yellow corn tortilla chips
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 2 ounces ricotta salata (salted dry ricotta), crumbled
  • Hot sauce and cilantro leaves

Preparation

  • Prepare campfire for medium-high heat; lightly oil grate. Grill tomatillos and jalapeños, turning occasionally, until lightly charred and beginning to collapse, 8–10 minutes; transfer to a cutting board.
  • Meanwhile, grill onion, turning occasionally, until charred and beginning to soften, 10–12 minutes; transfer to cutting board with charred tomatillos and jalapeños.
  • Finely chop tomatillos, chiles, and onion and transfer to a large skillet. Add lime juice and toss to combine; season salsa with salt and pepper. Set aside (keep in skillet).
  • Heat 2 Tbsp. oil in another large skillet on camp stove over medium-high. Crack eggs into skillet; season with salt and pepper. Cook, rotating skillet occasionally, until whites are golden brown and crisp at the edges and set around the yolk (which should still be runny), about 2 minutes.
  • Heat reserved salsa on camp stove over medium just to warm through. Mix in black beans and tortilla chips and cook, tossing and adding up to ¼ cup water if needed to loosen, until chips are just softened, about 3 minutes.
  • Serve chilaquiles in skillet topped with eggs, dollops of yogurt, ricotta salata, hot sauce, and cilantro.

The World’s Most Expensive RV

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The Palazzo

The first thing you will notice is that the Palazzo looks like some sort of vehicle you would see in

a movie set 50 years in the future. It also looks like an experiment gone horribly wrong, or something that would have aliens on board.

But the outside is not what people buy this luxury RV for, so let’s step inside!

On the inside you will find just an amazing amount of luxury, some necessary, some not, but it all adds up to give this one hefty price tag. Want to turn your RV into a rooftop bar and lounge? It can be done in a click of a button with the Palazzo.

Now this feature, while unnecessary, is something that is super cool. Imagine being able to hit a button and watch your roof turn into a place where you can have a bar and lounge? But the fun does not end there.

Continuing through this wonder you will find a fireplace, an underfloor heating system and a master bedroom located on the second floor that also features its very own luxurious bathroom.

With all this luxury you would think that this RV would just be a traffic jam waiting to happen, but you would be wrong in assuming that however. Despite all the amenities, the Palazzo can reportedly reach a top speed of 93 mph. That’s a lot of speed for a home on wheels.

What about safety you say? The Palazzo is on top if it.

A programmed central control provides all of your important information with by a graphic interface and a touch screen.

If you are leaving your Palazzo for a while, don’t worry! You can monitor your RV via an additional control unit. Remote video access allows you to show your friends the exterior and interior and also permits to pre-set the lighting and temperature for you return to the vehicle.

Basically everything you could ever want in an RV is in the Palazzo.

All Seasons RV Center

We hope that after showing you this RV you won’t be disappointed coming back to the real world of RVs.

If you need a great RV at a great price that has great amenities all for less than 2 percent of what the Palazzo costs, then come on down to All Seasons RV Center and let us show you around!

We offer a great selection of new and used RVs as well as a top notch service department that will get your rig back on the road in no time.

Stop by our location today at 3300 Colusa Hwy Yuba City, CA 95993 today!

Ultimate Camping Survival Guide Checklist

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Camping is a blast but is no small undertaking. If you are going to survive, you’ve got to be prepared! How do you know if you’re ready to take on Mother Nature for an overnight adventure or a multi-day stay? Here’s a quick survival guide checklist that will prepare you for any outdoor excursion! There’s one question to ask yourself: are you READY?

Research 

The first thing you should do before braving the elements is research. You need to investigate where you plan to camp, how you plan to get there, and what you should expect. Where you plan to camp is essential. You can read reviews on your perspective campsites to help you decide which site is best for you. You may want to call the campgrounds or park services ahead of time to see if any part of the park is under construction or closed for maintenance. Next, you need to know how to get to and from your site. Don’t expect your smartphone to have service out in the sticks, you’ll need to plan ahead and maybe even take a trail map with you to ensure you don’t get lost. Lastly, but most importantly, you need to research what you should expect wherever you plan to camp. First, check the weather. You want to know and plan accordingly if there’s a chance of rain. Also, check to see what the wildlife is in the area and what you should do in the event that you have a run in with any dangerous critters. Research if you will be around water, if there are any poisonous plants or snakes around, and plan to pack accordingly. Before you set out on your adventure, ask yourself if you have done adequate research.

Equipment

cool-camping-gear-hd-wallpaper-2It seems fairly obvious to make sure you have the right equipment before heading out, but all too often campers get caught up in the excitement and forget crucial camping elements. Set yourself up for success by double checking your equipment list. Do you have a tent that will be able to withstand the seasonal weather? Don’t think that your summer tent will be able to hack it in the winter months. Likewise, do you have the means necessary to collect firewood? It’s idealistic to think you will be able to collect enough dry, fallen, loose sticks to start and maintain a quality fire. Plan ahead by bringing a saw or starter logs. Don’t forget a lighter, either.Is your sleeping bag going to be able to withstand the chillier months? Will you need to bring a chair for sitting by the fire? If you plan to hammock, do you have the necessary straps and hooks? One helpful tip is to envision what you see yourself doing at your campsite and then filling in the blanks with the things you’ve forgotten.

Adequate Food

camping-food-1024x768There are tons of studies that break down exactly how many calories you need each day and what the percentage of carbs, fats, and proteins should be. Add meal planning to your research list and plan accordingly. It’s important that you take a practical amount of food on your trip. If you snack throughout the day on a regular basis, don’t assume that you are magically not going to get hungry until mealtime. Likewise, don’t go crazy at Wal-Mart to stock up for your trip. Remember that you have to transport all of those goods to wherever it is you’ll be staying. And the more extra food you have lying around at night, the more likely you are to have critter visitors.

Daily clothing

backpacking-clothes-summerNobody wants to overpack when going camping. After all, you’re supposed to be roughing it out there and you likely don’t want to lug a heavy load all throughout the woods. However, it is important to make sure that you pack enough clothing for your trip. Regardless of how long your camping adventure is, it’s good to bring at least one extra set of clothes. Here’s why: you never know what the weather will do. If a sudden storm rolls in, you likely won’t see it coming because you won’t have internet access. Likewise, you may find yourself completely sweating out your duds while trekking to and setting up your campsite. If your clothes are damp throughout the night it will be difficult for your body to heat itself up. Trust us on this one, you want to have at least one extra set of clothing just in case.

You’re forgetting…..

– That hygiene is still important even though you’re in the woods; bring a toothbrush and deodorant at the very least.

– That you have to drive home; don’t lock your keys in your car or lose them on your adventure.

r1wzlg4s.qigDoNotForget-PostItThat you will likely not have restroom access; bring a shovel and toilet paper (and a disposable bag so you don’t litter).

– That your phone might die or not work; bring a map and battery operated headlamp and alarm clock (assuming you need to get up by a certain time).

– That you might get hurt out there; hand sanitizer and rubbing alcohol are always good to have on hand incase you end up with a cut and want to keep it clean.

Are the wheels turning yet? These are just a few things you might forget. Be sure to double check and think back over any areas you might be forgetting in addition to this list!

All Seasons RV Center

Are you READY to camp? Come see us in Yuba City, CA and let us help you plan your next camping adventure. Our wide selection of RVs and friendly sales team will be happy to help as you plan a trip that’s perfect for you!

2015 JAYCO JAY SERIES SPORT 12UD

The 2015 Jay Series Sport delivers all the comforts of a pop-up camper at a price you can afford. Boasting 1,050-lb. rated bunk ends and convertible dinettes, you can forget sleeping on the ground.